Federal Aid

          The federal government uses census data to determine how to distribute financial aid, so each citizen that participates in the census directly contributes to their own well-being.

Your participation brings money to your community.

Each Person Counts

         An accurate 2020 census count will ensure that Georgians receive appropriate federal aid.

Older man being comforted in a waiting room.
Caption
The census determines how much federal aid goes towards programs in Georgia such as Medicare.

The 2010 census yielded a count of 9,687,653 people in Georgia and provided the state with $15.88 billion. Each Georgian that participated in the 2010 census effectively brought $1,639.10 to the state.*


 Many lives are enhanced through these programs and others. But funding for these programs is reliant upon an accurate census count.

         Many communities in Georgia are hard to count or have a low response rate. Each citizen must understand the level of impact they have by participating in the census. The higher the participation rate, the more federal aid for programs that, in turn, fund improvements for the state.

         In 2020, every Georgian can affect the amount of federal funding they receive until 2030.

Where exactly does the Federal Aid end up?

Federal funding comes in many different forms.

A chart showing distribution of 2015 Federal Funds by Category. (Public Health 51.7%, Families and Children 28.7%, Infrastructure 13.5%, and Education 6.1%).
Caption
Over half of 2015 federal funds designated for Georgia went toward public health.

Complete Distribution of 2015 Federal Funds

         Many Georgians rely on state programs made possible through federal funds. The following state programs, among others, received the indicated funds from the federal government in 2015, as determined by the 2010 Census.

Category

Program Name

Obligations (for 2015)

Public Health

Medical Assistance Program (Medicaid)

$4,773,280,541

Families & Children

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)

$2,803,606,880

Public Health

Medicare Part B (Supplemental Medical Insurance) – Physicians Fee Schedule Services

$1,780,523,543

Infrastructure

Highway Planning and Construction

$1,090,604,609

Families & Children

Section 8 Housing Choice Vouchers

$507,976,000

Families & Children

Title I Grants to Local Education Agencies

$506,503,923

Families & Children

National School Lunch Program

$506,294,315

Families & Children

State Children's Health Insurance Program (S-CHIP)

$410,564,000

Education

Special Education Grants (IDEA)

$329,101,551

Education

Head Start/Early Head Start

$226,341,627

Public Health

Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC)

$214,343,798

Families & Children

Section 8 Housing Assistance Payments Program (Project-based)

$197,103,835

Public Health

Health Center Programs (Community, Migrant, Homeless, Public Housing)

$104,340,922

Families & Children

Child Care and Development Fund- Entitlement

$93,828,000

Families & Children

Foster Care (Title IV-E)

$75,456,000

Families & Children

Low Income Home Energy Assistance (LIHEAP)

$55,874,930

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*($15,879,057,000 of federal aid in 2010) / (9,687,653 counted population in 2010 by census.gov) = $1,639.10 per person counted

Download this pdf file.Federal Aid to States for Fiscal Year 2010